Learning by Playing: Video Games in the Classroom

Students Playing Video Games

Class Media Nicole Dodson, Dakota Jerome Solbakken and Nadine Clements, students at Quest to Learn, a New York City public school, play a game they designed.

From what I’ve read about the effects of gaming on learners, this current shift in educational mediums is a compelling one. And I’ll tell you why.  My greatest concern for the next generation of students is their propensity to under-achieve.  It seems like the stereotypical teenage boy is getting so distracted by the constant bombardment of surrounding media, 24-7, that he looses all desire to excel academically.  I believe that the same sources that distracts these learners from their studies can also draw them back into their school subjects and help them reignite a passion for learning and hard work.

WHAT IF TEACHERS GAVE UP the vestiges of their educational past, threw away the worksheets, burned the canon and reconfigured the foundation upon which a century of learning has been built? What if we blurred the lines between academic subjects and reimagined the typical American classroom so that, at least in theory, it came to resemble a typical American living room or a child’s bedroom or even a child’s pocket, circa 2010 — if, in other words, the slipstream of broadband and always-on technology that fuels our world became the source and organizing principle of our children’s learning? What if, instead of seeing school the way we’ve known it, we saw it for what our children dreamed it might be: a big, delicious video game?

The language of gamers is, when you begin to decipher it, the language of strivers. People who play video games speak enthusiastically about “leveling up” and are always shooting for the epic win. Getting to the end of even a supposedly simple video game can take 15 or more hours of play time, and it almost always involves failure — lots and lots of failure.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/19/magazine/19video-t.html?_r=3&emc=eta1&pagewanted=all

I vote “yes” for video game development for the classroom.  My next question is,  who will fund these game developments since all the school districts are currently broke?


Advertisements

About bryantanner

I'm obsessed with learning via the appropriate technology. My professional mission is to effectively deliver instruction to learners in a way that yields the greatest results for all stakeholders involved.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s